Book Favorites: Childhood Edition

Here’s a list of books that I read in Elementary School, grades K-6, ages 5-12, which have stayed with me in some way, whether it be their story-lines, their inspiring characters, or an especially scarring scene. Most are from the later stages of primary schooling, but all of these titles have had an impact on me and continue to influence my writing to this day. This was before the age of the ebook, so I read all these books the good ol’ fashioned way, and I have fond memories of eagerly perusing the aisles in Barnes and Noble and Borders, waiting for a particularly intriguing spine to catch my eye…

The Silverwing Saga by Kenneth Oppel
I downloaded and read Oppel’s book This Dark Endeavor recently, and was immediately reminded of how much I loved his Silverwing books when I was growing up. The first book in the series, Silverwing, is one of my all-time favorites, and I read both Silverwing and Sunwing multiple times. I never expected to become so attached to books about bats, but the characters – Shade, Marina, Ariel, Orestes, Chinook, Frieda, Zephyr, Griffin, Luna, Java, Ishmael, Goth, etc – are so excellently written and the world-building in the novels is superb, I was engrossed from start to finish. I loved them so much I did a science project about bats when I was in elementary school. Shade and Marina’s adventures captivated me, the bats of the Vampyrum Spectrum terrified me, and I’m planning a reread in the near future. I also haven’t read the prequel novel Darkwing yet, so I should probably add that to my list!

The Chronicles of Narnia Series by C.S. Lewis
Honestly… did anyone not read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe as a kidWe read the second (and likely, the most well known) book in the series in class (not sure which grade, maybe second) and I loved it so much my mom read a couple of the others to my sister and me as bedtime stories. I remember flipping through The Silver Chair to read ahead because I couldn’t wait to know what happened next. I have to say, my favorite is The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, but The Horse and His Boy is also high on the list. And I can’t leave out The Magician’s Nephew, which was actually the last one I read, despite it being the first book chronologically. I’ve read this series many times over and it never loses its appeal. For me, C.S. Lewis’s rich words and descriptions, his charming characters, and the fantastic, magical world of Narnia come second only to Tolkien and Middle Earth  when it comes to fantasy.

Behind the Attic Wall by Sylvia Cassedy
This is actually one title that I don’t have much to say in regards to the plot, because I don’t remember much of it. All I remember of the plot is that a young girl finds two dolls behind the wall in the attic of the house she is staying in, and they sort of become friends to her. But I do remember being utterly fascinated by this book when I read it, to the point where I read it again immediately after. And yet, I forgot about this book for a long time and even forgot the title. However, after some recent sleuthing, I was able to track it down and ordered myself an old copy, so I can get reacquainted. Hopefully it’s as magical as I recall.

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
My third grade teacher pulled me aside one day before our SSR (Sustained Silent Reading) period and asked me if I felt up to reading a book that was considered a bit out of my age range, and I happily agreed. The story of a spoiled, but dejected girl and her desire to discover the rumored “secret garden” as well as uncover the mysteries of the cries she hears at night was definitely difficult to read at that age. In fact, I went through and read it a second time just to be sure I understood it, and I’m glad I did, because once I had a clearer understanding of it, I felt that I could appreciate it more. This book taught me to pay close attention in order to see something for its true value; which could also be seen as a theme in the novel. I definitely credit this book for establishing my love for the “classics.”

Where The Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
*cries forever*
I’m in my twenties now and just thinking about this book makes me emotional. WHY DO THEY LET CHILDREN READ THIS? I mean, we read it in sixth grade, but still… it packed a wallop. Worse than Old Yeller, even. But it did teach me a valuable lesson about loss and the love of a boy for his dogs, so I am glad that I read it, even if it did make me cry. And boy, did I cry…

The Giver by Lois Lowry
Before I had Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World, and Anthem, to ponder, there was The Giver. We actually read this book aloud in class, but I don’t remember which grade it was – probably fifth or sixth. I do, however, remember the profound effect this novel had on me. Jonas’s struggles to understand the time and memories before “Sameness” took over society resonated with me, and I still remember realizing what “Elsewhere” meant. This book was haunting, but in a good way, and I credit it for helping establish my love for science fiction and dystopian fiction.

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
We read this book in fifth grade, and I re-read it last year once I heard they were attempting a new film adaptation. L’Engle brought new ideas, fresh characters, a fusion of religious/spiritual and scientific thought, and a unique perspective to the fantasy/sci-fi genre with this book, as well as the subsequent titles in the series. The concept of “IT” still scares me, even now. There are still a few titles in the overall series that I haven’t read yet, but I hope to finish them someday.

Time Stops for No Mouse by Michael Hoeye
I read this book on my own when I was in sixth grade. I adored the title character, Hermux Tantamoq – largely because he was a mouse (I was very fond of rodents in my youth, not sure why) – but also because he was an unlikely hero with a heart of gold, and that made him all the more likable and easy to follow. This book is part mystery, part adventure, and all entertaining, with a great cast of characters and a plot that uses a familiar formula, but has a ton of twists and turns that keep the reader guessing. I’m talking mole journalists, a rejuvenation potion, and mice who fly planes. I also just learned this book has sequels, so you can guess what I’ll be reading in the future…

The Tales of Dimwood Forest by Avi
You can probably sense a theme, here… I like books about animals, and that was especially true during my early years as a reader. Specifically, I liked rodents; of both the winged and non-winged variety. Redwall would be on this list but I didn’t read it until 7th grade. I actually read this series out of order; I started with Poppy and Rye, then Poppy, then Ereth’s Birthday, then Ragweed. Regardless, this series remains a fond favorite from my childhood and I literally (as in, two seconds after I wrote the previous sentence) JUST DISCOVERED that there are two titles in the series that I haven’t read, so I’ll be adding those to my “to-read” list in short order. I was enthralled by the tales of the brave mouse Poppy, the foul-mouthed porcupine Ereth, and the quiet, determined Rye, and a special shout out to Brian Floca, who did the illustrations. I can still clearly picture the characters in my head and I loved the way he drew them.

 

 

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