Film Review: Avengers: Endgame (2019)

Dir: Russo Bros
Starring: Everyone, really.
Runtime: 3hr1min
Rating: PG-13
Spoiler level: Light (ANY MAJOR SPOILERS WILL BE BELOW A CUT)

20190425_172726_HDR.jpgAt last, the moment Marvel fans have been waiting for is finally upon us – the hotly-anticipated sequel to 2018’s Avengers: Infinity War and the culmination of a 22-film saga that began with 2008’s Iron Man has been released for eager audiences to devour. Avengers: Endgame is an epic three-hour adventure that offers an explosive, entertaining, and emotional ending to  the first major chapter of a steadily expanding film universe.

Avengers: Endgame follows the remaining non-dusty Avengers in the post-Snap world as they come to terms with Thanos’s actions and seek to inject hope into their seemingly-dismal circumstances.

There were several things that Endgame needed to accomplish on the heels of the dramatic Infinity War, and hundreds of dangling threads to tie together from multiple movies in the franchise. I don’t know how the Russo brothers, the writers, and everyone who works on these films does it, but somehow, some way, they managed to balance out fan-service, humor, heart, action, a balanced narrative, and a multitude of characters and their interactions in a huge film universe to create a thrilling and satisfying conclusion. Sure, some folks can probably nitpick and find a stone or two left un-turned, but of all the factors fans expected this film the deliver, the most important is probably closure. And though certain fans may disagree with how certain events played out, this film felt complete when the credits began to roll.

Of course, the core of the Avengers are the original squad, with RDJ as Iron Man / Tony Stark, Chris Evans as Captain America / Steve Rogers, Chris Hemsworth as Thor, Mark Ruffalo as Hulk / Bruce Banner, Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow / Natasha Romanoff, and Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye / Clint Barton. They’ve been with us the longest, have fought the most battles, and have established themselves as characters who are important to fans, and have had a lasting impact on audiences. Appropriately, much of the spotlight centers on them this time around – not entirely on them, because there are a lot of characters to give screen-time to, but primarily on them – and it gives each a chance to show how far their characters have come since their initial appearances. And by the end, each of their journeys feels finished, their arcs complete, their characters fully-developed.

Endgame delivers the usual Marvel staples – witty banter and memorable quotes, bombastic fight scenes and action sequences, stunning visuals, and throwbacks to prior films and other Marvel lore. It’s all too easy for MCU films to rely on hallmarks and a successful formula – I mean, if it works, it works – but even 22 films deep, this installment offers up twists and surprises. Some familiar, but perhaps unexpected faces show up. Some plot points seem predictable, but take jarring detours. Even the expected events are engrossing. It didn’t feel like I was sitting in a movie theater seat for three hours, and not once did I think, “Is it over yet?” I laughed, I sat in open-mouthed shock, and yes… there were tears. And when it was over, the fan in me was so happy to have been along for the entire ride, and I’m excited to see where the MCU goes next.

For a film series that has been churning out successful film after successful film, barreling forward and building momentum since 2008, Endgame offers a finale that is sure to keep audiences engaged from start to finish. The MCU has experienced some bumps in the road and has battled through fatigue in order to keep viewers in their seats, but they have also proven the merit of superhero films time and time again, and when it matters most, they deliver the closure that the Infinity Saga needs.

Overall rating: 10/10

***********UNDER THIS ARE THE SPOILERS, BEWARE, STOP READING IF YOU DON’T WANT SPOILERS!!!!! THERE IS A READ MORE THING UNDER THIS BUT I KNOW IT SOMETIMES DOESN’T WORK, SO HERE IS YOUR WARNING!!!!!*************

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Five Favorite Avengers from the MCU!

(To celebrate the coming of Avengers: Endgame this Friday, I thought I would list my five favorite Avengers thus far. I am on vacation atm, so I apologize if this post is not as fleshed out as it could be!)

198336-004-0F77A0005.) Black Panther / T’Challa 
In the MCU, T’Challa’s rise to prominence has been one of the most unique – and one of the best to witness. After getting a taste of Black Panther’s abilities in Captain America: Civil War (2016), his following 2018 eponymous solo-film solidified his place as one of the coolest, and most well-developed characters in the entire MCU, despite being one of the newest. He is not just the King of Wakanda – he is a hero who has faced doubt and uncertainty head on, and strives to do what is best for the people he is sworn to protect. His suit is awesome, his character and personality are balanced, and I look forward to seeing him (and Okoye and Shuri, of course) grace the silver screen in future installments. If the others can bring him back from “The Snappening”, of course.

Brie-Larson-as-Carol-Danvers-in-Captain-Marvel4.) Captain Marvel / Carol Danvers
Another brand-new face in a sea of super greats, Captain Marvel’s 2019 solo outing was out first official look at the character, other than a tiny teaser at the end of 2018’s Infinity War. Honestly, I didn’t expect to like Carol as much as I did, but, despite being so new, I already find her to be one of the most endearing heroes in the whole MCU. She displays a compelling balance of humanity, vulnerability, humor, and badassery, which combines to make her journey thrilling to watch. As someone who was once a little girl who loved superheroes, it warms my heart to see little girls buying Captain Marvel merchandise and wearing shirts or bags with her likeness on it. However, Captain Marvel is not just a great female superhero – she is an amazing hero who anyone can look to and find a bit of themselves in. If she truly is meant to be the new face of the MCU, then I have the utmost faith in whatever is to come next. 

236ebe085b15fa7af27b80a63c6240053.) Doctor Strange / Steven Strange
What can I say? I am drawn to sarcastic assholes. I knew little about the character when I sat down to watch 2016’s Doctor Strange, but emerged from the theater totally spellbound. His abilities are the coolest to see onscreen, bar none – but his magic is not only visually striking, it’s capable of incredible, unorthodox feats that standard butt-kicking isn’t able to convey. But his hero persona is only half of it – he’s also a compelling character because Steven Strange isn’t completely likable, despite his quick wit and serious nature. He starts out sarcastic and pompous and downright arrogant, and though he changes and admits to his faults and embraces his new role as a master of the mystic arts by the end of his solo film, he never quite sheds those prickly bits of his personality. He doesn’t have the charm of Tony Stark to dampen those traits, but really, that just makes him more relatable – heroes aren’t always perfect role models, after all. Plus, he’s got the best sidekick in the entire MCU – his cape.

images.jpg2.) Ant-Man / Scott Lang
I’ve said it before, and I will say it again (and again, if I have to) – Ant-Man and his epic size-changing adventures are the kind of breather fans of the MCU need to break up the do-or-die, lives-at-stake nature of most films in the series. Both 2015’s Ant-Man and 2018’s Ant-Man and the Wasp came on the heels of significantly more “dramatic films” in Age of Ultron and Infinity War, and were welcome doses of heart and humor after such high-stakes installments. Scott Lang is – arguably – the most “human” of the Avengers; he’s a family guy with a complicated criminal history and he just wants to do right by his daughter and those he cares about – and maybe save the world, if he gets included in events like 2016’s Civil War. Ant-Man is the perfect example of what happens when a truly average person gets bestowed with great responsibility, which makes him easy to watch and connect with. He makes mistakes, but also does his best to right them no matter how difficult it can be. Besides… his size-changing hi-jinks will never not be funny to me. Heroes do come in all sizes – and Ant-Man is the literal embodiment of that sentiment.

captain-america.jpg1.) Captain America / Steve Rogers 
Of the original crew of major Avengers, I have found Captain America’s journey to be the most compelling. From 2011’s Captain America: The First Avenger, where a scrawny boy finds not only incredible physical power, but the strength within himself to become a hero, to 2014’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier, where Cap’s unwavering sense of honor drives him to walk away from, and uncover the conspiracy within S.H.I.E.L.D, to 2016’s Captain America: Civil War, where Steve refuses to comply with restrictions and stands up for what he believes is right, even if it means splintering the Avengers at their core… his trilogy has felt the most complete. His character arc has experienced the most ups and downs across all of his appearances, but they have all contributed in making him a multi-layered, believable, and interesting character to watch, and he has always felt genuine in all of his actions. Captain America went from the poster boy for S.H.I.E.L.D. to a defiant rebel who will stand by his choices, but maintains the heart and the loyalty that have defined him from the start. Cap’s remarkable journey may soon be coming to an end following Endgame, but if it does… I can proudly say that he is my favorite, and will likely continue to be, no matter how many new characters are introduced.

Film Review: Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Dir. Taika Waititi
Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Jeff Goldblum, Tom Hiddleston, Cate Blanchett, Tessa Thompson, Mark Ruffalo, Anthony Hopkins, Karl Urban, and Idris Elba
Rating: PG-13
Runtime: 2hr10m
Spoiler level: Light, some mention of plot points but no end spoilers.

Of all the MCU major Avenger film trilogies, I have generally considered the Thor films to be the weakest, so I went into the third installment, Thor: Ragnarok, with tempered expectations. Two hours later, I came out of the theater with sore cheeks from laughing so hard and my expectations thoroughly blown away, as if by the sheer force of Hela’s wrath, Hulk’s incredible smash, or Thor’s lightning prowess.

MV5BMjMyNDkzMzI1OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODcxODg5MjI@._V1_UY1200_CR90,0,630,1200_AL_.jpgThor: Ragnarok follows the titular hero (Hemsworth) as he strives to free Asgard from the chaotic rule of his previously exiled elder sister, Hela, Goddess of Death (Blanchett). In an effort to prevent Ragnarok, Thor must endure capture by an outcast Valkyrie (Thompson), forced combat with the Hulk (Ruffalo), continuing sibling strife with adopted brother Loki (Hiddleston), and the loss of his beloved Mjolnir.

I’ve always thought that, when in the presence of the other Avengers, Thor’s character tends to get overshadowed, but Hemsworth nailed it in his third solo outing and has officially proven that Thor can hold his own against the likes of Iron Man and Captain America. He rocked the heroic moments and his humor was on point – Thor’s otherwordly humor has always been a highlight of his character, and it’s dialed up to ten for this film with hilarious results. The “Get help” bit had me laughing so hard I was afraid the woman behind me was going to ask me to get a grip. Hemsworth’s chemistry with Hiddleston as Loki is also stellar, and Hiddleston continues to ooze both charm and deception in what is likely his last outing as the semi-sympathetic villain, and stands as possibly the most well-developed menace of the entire MCU. Blanchett is delightful as the near-unstoppable Hela, and shows what might have happened had Galadriel become a queen as great and terrible as the dawn. Ruffalo returns as Bruce Banner/the Hulk, and his rapport with Hemsworth is a highlight along with Hulk’s overall development, as he now carries conversations and doesn’t devolve into smash mode on a constant basis. The introduction of Valkyrie is a pleasant one, as her complex history and abilities as a fighter prove her to be an excellent ally for the Asgardian hero. Hopkins also briefly returns as Odin, and though his appearance is short, it makes an impression. Idris Elba as Heimdall and Karl Urban as Hela’s conflicted henchman Skurge are both great in supporting roles. And how could I leave out Jeff Goldbum, as Grandmaster? All I can say is… he’s Jeff Goldblum. And it’s fantastic.

The cameos are enjoyable, with a peek at one of 2016’s breakout heroes Doctor Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) and three surprise cameos (I won’t spoil them) during an early scene on Asgard. It’s a “Is that really __________?” moment, thrice over, and done very well. Sad we didn’t get to see Sif this time around, but honestly, the film is enjoyable enough that I didn’t even feel her absence, and I didn’t feel the loss of Jane Foster one bit (I do love Natalie Portman though, for the record, and Jamie Alexander as well). I didn’t even miss Thor’s hair! Additionally, the music is great, the colors are fun and bright, which creates a much more visually-pleasing aesthetic than some of the previous films, which have a darker, more serious atmosphere.

The strength of this film is easily the humor and more lighthearted nature, as the film-makers perhaps looked to the success of Guardians of the Galaxy for what tone and direction to take, and it certainly pays off. I laughed out loud several times, and just started giggling again thinking of a particular joke. Though, that’s not to say that the action doesn’t deliver, because it does; the battles are all vivid and engrossing and none of the action sequences feel dragged out or too long. The overall pacing is done well, and though it seems as though the plot starts to meander a bit in the middle, the jokes and the character interactions keep it from feeling drawn out, and the final battle does not feel rushed and crammed into the end. The narrative is balanced between action with dire consequences, focus on the lead character and his inner conflict, and all of the external conflicts going on at the same time, with Hela’s wrath being unleashed upon Asgard, the Grandmaster’s gladiatorial games, and Thor’s efforts to wrangle a new team to assist him with saving the realm(s). With so many players on the field and such a stacked cast, it would be so easy for this film to devolve into a muddles mess with several personalities vying for screen time, but each plot point gets a decent amount of attention and no character feels like they got left to the wayside. And, though it might just be my inability to pay attention to detail, I didn’t really predict how the final conflict was going to play out, and there were enough surprises throughout the film to keep me on the edge of my seat.

After the lackluster Thor: The Dark World, I wasn’t looking forward to Ragnarok as much I was some of the other MCU installments, but the third Thor outing definitely stands as one of the best, might be a top contender for the funniest, and has made me even more excited to see our favorite golden-haired Asgardian prince in action during Infinity War next year.

Overall Rating: 9/10