My Week in Movies

So my internet is terrible and I had to write all of this on my phone, please excuse any typos. But this week I managed to get to the theater four times, so I thought I’d post some mini reviews…

Avengers: Endgame (Reissue): The sequel to last year’s massive Marvel hit Infinity War and the end of a cibematic era was reissued last weekend with some bonus features tacked onto the end, including a wonderful Stan Lee tribute. I also got an awesome free poster to add to my collection. It’s worth seeing if you’re a die-hard fan or have only seen Endgame once or twice, but if you miss out, it’s not the end of the world… or the game, I guess. I had only seen it once, on premiere night, so I was happy to watch again.

Yesterday: A quirky rom-com set in a world where a massive electrical surge inexplicably causes the entire world (save a select few) to forget about the Beatles, thus launching down-on-his-luck singer Jack Malick to international fame as he performs their iconic songs as his own. This film offers up a few surprises and makes a unique spin on a genre that’s been explored a thousand times, and the two leads (Himesh Patel and Lily James) deliver performances full of charm and humor. Totally worth seeing if you’re a music fan or a rom-com fan or both, even though it is hard to imagine a world where the Beatles never existed. And thanks to Himesh Patel, I have a new addition to my celebrity crush list…

Spider-Man: Far From Home: Just as Ant-Man and the Wasp was the perfect follow up to Infinity War, this filn is a great follow up to the dramatic and emotionally-heavy Endgame. Tom Holland continues to prove himself worthy of the role of the famous web-slinger as he grapples both teen angst and personal doubt in the wake of losing his mentor, Tony Stark. The boy just wants a a European vacation – and to impress MJ, of course – but the appearance of Mysterio (an excellent Jake Gyllenhaal) and some otherwordly threats throw a wrench in his plans. It’s hard to be a teen super hero, but our beloved Peter Parker is a joy to watch as he fights with bad guys and feelings. I don’t want to toss out spoilers, but this movie also has BOMBSHELL post credits scenes that will make your jaw drop. Loved it, loved it, loved it.

Midsommar: Ari Aster’s feature film debut Hereditary made a big splash last year and made it on my personal top 10 list for 2018. This folk-horror outing – in which a young woman recovering from tragedy, her distant boyfriend, and their friends travel to a secluded Swedish commune for a festival – is similar in tone to Hereditary, as it is a slow (maybe, at two hours and 27 minutes, a bit too slow) burn to an explosive conclusion and has creepy twists that will keep the viewer on the edge of their seats. Florence Pugh is fantastic, the cinematography and direction are stunning, and the film is easily set apart from other films in the genre that rely on cheap scares and gimmicks. Aster’s “artsy-horror” style won’t be for everyone, but I look forward to seeing even more in the future.

Biggest Oscar Snubs

1.) Toni Collette / Ari Aster / Hereditary
This film got rave reviews, yet was forgotten when awards season finally rolled around. Toni Collette’s performance in this film is half the reason it’s so terrifying; she is able to encompass the mood of the film and project it in such an effective manner it resonates off the screen. Her not getting a nomination is an injustice to her work on this film. Ari Aster’s directing is nothing to scoff at, either – and though it might have been a long shot, I would have loved to see him get a directing nod. I also think it should have been nominated for Best Picture, FIGHT ME.

2.) Mission Impossible: Fallout
I’m not even a fan of the series (this is the only one I’ve seen) but even I know it should have gotten a nod for something. It was an all-around great, popular film that earned a positive critical reception, and yet, nada.

3.) Annihilation
This film was not only condemned to a depressing February release date last year, dooming it to be forgotten when awards season rolled around, but it had a lackluster release, was tragically overlooked for being too “intellectual” and, thus, led to many movie-goers missing out on what was the best sci-fi (and one of the best horror) films of 2018. Yes, it’s got one of those endings – where you’re initial reaction is “…huh?” and then, as it settles and you unpack it, you’re forced to think and interpret what the meaning could be – but that’s to the film’s credit, not a detriment. It deserved some kind of recognition, especially in the special effects, sound, or cinematography department.

4.) Eighth Grade / Bo Burnham
I adored this film, yet it somehow slipped past the Oscar noms this year. It captured the awkwardness of adolescence in such a poignant way, making audiences both cringe at the palpable awkwardness while also relating to the struggles of a teenage girl searching for acceptance. The writing was sharp and the directing was stellar for Bo Burnham’s debut, and I would have loved to see him get at least a writing nod. Fortunately, actress Elsie Fisher, though she didn’t get a nod, looks to have a long career ahead of her.

5.) Justin Hurwitz / Linus Sandgren / First Man
Justin Hurwitz won a Golden Globe and a Critic’s Choice award, among others, for his incredible score for First Man, but didn’t even get a nod from the Academy. I mean, come on… he used a THEREMIN. A THEREMIN, PEOPLE. And Linus Sandgren’s incredible cinematography should have gotten a nod too; the cinematography in this film was absolutely stunning, especially the scenes in space. Basically, this film somehow flew under the radar this awards season, and it’s a real shame it isn’t getting as much buzz as some other titles that shall not be named…

Also, arguably…

6.) Bradley Cooper
I mean, he got the acting nod, which is great…but I actually think he should have gotten a directing nod, too. In fact (CONTROVERSIAL OPINION INCOMING) I think his directorial prowess on this film surpassed his acting. And that’s saying a lot, because his acting was remarkable in the film. It takes a lot to make an overdone story feel new, and his directorial skills are a large part of why ASiB felt fresh and evocative, despite having been made thrice before. And it was his debut, to boot! Granted, everyone nominated for the category is entirely deserving, and I’m betting on my man Alfonso to take it home, but still… I was stunned Cooper’s name was not on the list.

7.) Timothée Chalamet
I’m putting him for two reasons, even though I have yet to see Beautiful Boy. The first is that I’ve heard his performance was stellar, and the second is that I still think he got robbed for last year’s Lead Actor award. Also, he’s great.

And, in an UNEXPECTED TWIST, here’s one film that SHOULD* have been snubbed!

*in my opinion

1.) Bohemian Rhapsody
Aside from Rami Malek’s brilliant turn as eccentric front man Freddie Mercury, which is 1000% worthy of a Best Actor nod, this film, though purported as “accurate” in it’s portrayal of true events, is little more than a formulaic presentation of a band’s rise to triumph. I was shocked that it won the Golden Globe, as I don’t even think it should have been nominated for that, either. Don’t get me wrong – it’s not a bad movie. It’s entertaining, the performances are great, and the soundtrack is – of course – amazing. The director is shit, but that’s besides the point. I personally think there were more deserving films of the prestigious Best Picture nod, that’s all I’m saying.